WRITING 101: A letter to a word.


The following is part of a 20 day challenge to get into a better habit of blogging. Each day presents a new prompt. Today’s promptPick up the nearest book and flip to page 29. What’s the first word that jumps off the page? Use this word as your springboard for inspiration. If you need a boost, Google the word and see what images appear, and then go from there.  Today’s twist: write the post in the form of a letter. Each post is a rough draft, so please excuse typos, flights of fancy, or hyperbole. (But feel free to leave suggestions for improvement, corrections, constructive criticism or crass remarks in the comments below.)

Lab Physicist Helps Create 'Art as Portal to Science' Feature for Scientific American. The word "Physicist" came from page 29 of the book "The Price of Salt" by Patricia Highsmith.

Lab Physicist Helps Create ‘Art as Portal to Science’ Feature for Scientific American.
The word “Physicist” came from page 29 of the book “The Price of Salt” by Patricia Highsmith.

Dear Physicist,

Newton, Hawkins, Einstein.  I am fascinated by all of your works. Through computation and study you have delved into the invisible, helped to stitch the universe together in an ever-expanding, yet mysterious way. You peer at atoms and see the cosmos.

In one sense, you hope to help unlock the answer to one of my biggest questions: how did I end up here? You’ve done a good job getting close so far, minus some of the smaller details.

You say I am the stuff of stars. In some physical sense as old as the universe itself. I just wish I could remember the journey.

Because in your studies of the physical I’m not quite certain you’ve answered the what or the why. Why am I here? What is my purpose? Are there some invisible laws to be computed, to explain? Are there invisible strings binding us all together. Tug on my heart string and the universe feels it? Am I a place holder in some grand structure? Are we all atoms, particles or sub-particles in constant orbit of each other, bound together, part of something larger we cannot see from our vantage point?

Or are we black holes? All consuming, crushed in the gravity of our own thoughts, the dark part of something once light and great?

Is there escape?

Will we eventually go dark and cold? Or do we continue forever, matter and energy never to be destroyed?

Is it true what the mystics say?

A quick response would be much obliged. I am not sure I have much time, or understand the nature of that time itself.

Sincerely,

Me

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9 thoughts on “WRITING 101: A letter to a word.

  1. Richard Feynman would be proud. Clearly, you had fun writing this and it’s fun to read. And you’ve got a couple of great lines…

    All consuming, crushed in the gravity of our own thoughts…

    In some physical sense as old as the universe itself. I just wish I could remember the journey.

    Fun stuff!

  2. Overall, LOVED it. I was reading Einstein’s bio yesterday, oddly enough. My favorite (made me laugh out loud): A quick response would be much obliged. I am not sure I have much time, or the nature of that time itself.

    Found a couple things you may want to tweak:
    the answer to one of my biggest questions: how did I end up here? (replaced comma with colon)
    Am I place holder (Am I a place holder)

  3. Humans endless quest, to know who we are, where we came from, and where are we going, and more importantly, “what is my purpose?”

    This great, there is humor unlying the serious, there is wondring within the wonder…

    Great work Brian,

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